Patchwork and quilting for the fashion forward, Part II

In this post, I return to the trends for interiors  identified in Elle Decoration for 2018, and have a look at how we might adapt them to add a bit of an update to our textile work.

Plates on the wall

I have to admit that I found this one quietly hilarious, having been brought up in an age when old ladies had plates on the wall, but the difference here is that the plates are either solid colours or very sophisticated patterns.  I have adapted this for my garden and have collected and painted plates for the fences.  With regard to textiles, many of the craft magazines such as Mollie Makes, which I really like, by the way, run features on mounting work in embroidery frames/hoops and putting those on the wall.  I am not sure how many of us actually do that in ‘real life’.  On the other hand, the porthole quilt could be an adaptation of the circular theme.  This is a form of a reverse appliqué with a large cut out circle on top revealing the feature fabric underneath.  I have made one block of this just to try it out, and it is a nice effect and so I might make more.  It is one way of working with large circles.

The plates in the article certainly were too beautiful to eat off, and I think that is analogous to some fabric being too beautiful to cut.  This would be a way round having to slice into very lovely fabric and also a way to use difficult fabric like woven metallics as the feature cloth can remain a square under the circular aperture.

Colour trends

The colour trends this spring and summer include grey.  This is a bit of a disappointment given that in the UK at the moment pretty much all the weather we have is grey.  There is one element of inspiration here, though, which is the notion of using different textures of grey including metal, metallic mesh, concrete, stained wood and so on.  I like taking one colour and using a lot of shades of it, particularly red, which I think really benefits from this treatment.  I certainly know a lot of fabric and textile artists who work extensively with different neutral textures to great effect and it would make an interesting project to use some different textures in a large piece.

Other colour trends include monochrome and there are lots of black and white graphic patterns in interior design magazines at the moment.  The twist is that the monotone is pared with terracotta.  I am not a big fan of terracotta; it reminds me too much of the 1980s and really quite nasty furnishing fabrics and paint charts.  I think I could just about cope with it as a highlight colour or a sparkle fabric in a monotone quilt.  Burgundy is also singled out.  This is another of my least favourite colours, so it looks like I am doomed this season.

Fairly monotone table runner in my studio,

Reflective surfaces

In interior design terms this means lots of mirrors and shiny paint.  In textiles I don’t think we can go as far as reflective surfaces, unless we use really massive sequins or pieces of acrylic, but we could try putting in a bit of metallic fabric into our work occasionally,  The odd patch of gold or silver always perks things up in my view.

Bristol Blue Bubbles Anita

Bristol Blue Bubbles Anita

This panel from a quilt of mine was stitched and then painted with my very favourite Golden Fluid acrylics.  I like them because they are liquid but with a lot of pigment so the colour stays true even if you put it over brightly coloured fabric like this yellow silk.

Bengal tiger rugs – not real

This is a bit of a if you only take away one thing let it be this moment.  It seems that the Bengal tiger is a super trendy motif.

I suppose we could use this as a colour scheme inspiration: black, white and orange which would make a zingy type of quilt, or think about making an appliqué piece which would be an alternative to a tiger rug.  I would love to have a go at this if I had time.

 

5 replies
  1. Judith Barker
    Judith Barker says:

    When I was a very little girl a great-uncle had an actual tiger-skin rug, complete with head and teeth. My brother and I (sadly he can’t remember it, he was too young) thought it was absolutely wonderful and loved to lie on it. My apologies to all tigers!

    Reply
  2. Ann Gregory
    Ann Gregory says:

    Ann,
    We met at Shire Stitchers last Wednesday when I enquired about your Westbury on Trym tea towel. Did you ask your husband if I would be able to get one for my WI group?
    Kind regards
    Ann

    Reply

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